Thibault Guignes Wins First Place Overall At AIDA Freediving World Cup 2021

Thibault Guignes is France's National Record holder in FIM, a beast of a freediver, and an all-around awesome guy! Just recently, he took part in the AIDA Freediving World Cup 2021, where he managed to win first place overall. Here's what he had to say about his experience at the competition. Are You Happy With Your Performance? I won the overall ranking of the AIDA Freediving World Cup which is an international competition organized by Andrea Zuccari in his freediving center: Freediving World in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt. The competition brought 40 Athletes from all over the world, saw many National Records set and three World Records attempted, that unfortunately didn't work. How Is That Calculated? The overall ranking in the competition was calculated over the four days of the competition. Each meter of depth would get you one point and each discipline can give you points only one time. The best strategy for this kind of competition is therefore to perform in each of the four depth disciplines: FIM, CWTB, CWT, and CWNF. The constant weight discipline is traditionally performed with a monofin, but I am in general more comfortable with my bifins, so I decided to perform the Constant Weight dive with them. By announcing it as a Constant Weight dive and not a constant weight with bifins dive, I could get the points for the overall ranking.       How Were The Conditions During The Comp? Conditions were good during the competition. You have to keep in mind that with 40 athletes diving on one official line, it takes 6 hours to have everyone diving. It is hard to have consistent conditions for such a long time, so on some days, some of us were confronted with a little bit of current or some waves. That's part of the sport and not always easy to judge if you should perform the dive or not, or turn early during the dive.      Did You Feel That You Were Well Prepared? I felt very well prepared for this competition. I had performed quite deeper dives in training in the two previous weeks and we decided with my coach, Nicholas Kouvaras, to go for easy dives during the competition. I am trying this year to have an approach really more progressive than the previous year where I was diving very deep all year round.  I went for deep dives before the comp in training in a very relaxed setup and really enjoyed my dives during the competition. We had planned three days of competition for me but after those three days, I realized that I had good chances to be on the podium or to win if I would dive the last day. I went for it.     Which Other Performances Stood Out For You? There were several impressive performances in this competition. I will remember Abdelatif Allouach setting a new National Record for France in Constant Weight with Bifins at 111m, so close to the world record. Vitomir Maricic from Croatia with a new National Record in Constant weight without fins at 77m that looked so easy. Peter Klovar also from Croatia with a very strong Free Immersion National Record at 111m. It was really cool to watch 3 World Record attempts, even if they didn't succeed. Alexey Molchanov demonstrated once again he is the boss with very impressive dives. I really enjoyed watching the new generation of French freedivers like Jimmy Jeantot and Mathieu Maraio that shred the Free Immersion podium with me. And finally watching Alena Konecna manage being a full time mom and performing deep dives, setting National Record, and being 2nd overall of the competition was a humbling experience.   Given The Chance, Would You Do Anything Differently? Not a single thing on this competition. I had a lot of fun that we shared with many friends in the competition. I received so much support and congratulations from everywhere that I just feel happy and grateful. I would not want to change that!   Will We See A WR Attempt From You This Year? Doing my best to get there!!!     Future Plans? I am now in Egypt working for one more month before flying to the Bahamas to train and compete in Vertical Blue. This edition is going to be epic, with live coverage from the diveye system and so many great athletes. I will probably head to Kalamata in Greece after that and see how the situation evolves. If the Philippines reopen, my brand new shop is waiting for me on Camotes Island. My business partner Ben and I would definitely go back there. If the Philippines stay closed for longer, you might see me at World Championships in the fall. Watch Thibault Dive To -110m With His V3 Carbon Fins During Training In Kalamata
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What Is The Difference Between A Blackout And An LMC

Low oxygen levels are not fun, neither on land nor underwater. We need oxygen to survive, plain and simple, so we have to do whatever it takes to have it running in our bloodstream. In an interview with Tokushikai Canada, Sheena McNally, Canada's deepest woman, tapped into the uneasy world of hypoxia. What is hypoxia? What is the difference between a blackout and an LMC? Why do they occur? Find out.  Hypoxia "We have a couple of terms for hypoxia, which is low oxygen, so I guess the most serious one would be a blackout, which is a loss of consciousness due to low oxygen. Typically that would happen at the end of the dive when the oxygen level is the lowest and, if it's going to happen, it would be on the surface, as the diver releases the first breath that they were holding throughout the dive, and then they start doing their recovery breathing. Unfortunately for us, there's a delay in the time it takes for that oxygen to get into our lungs, into the alveoli, into the bloodstream, and then, you know, to the heart and then to the brain. So in that time, if we're close to our edge we can have cerebral hypoxia, which’s a blackout due to low oxygen. The body's not out of oxygen, we're not at zero, the figure that they teach in the AIDA courses is that we're probably around 50%, but I think it would vary individual to individual. But what's happening is the body is prioritizing oxygen use. Being conscious takes a lot of oxygen, like looking at things and listening to things and thinking, and we don't need to be conscious to be alive, so I picture it as the body going into like a computer sleep mode type of thing. It's not desirable by any stretch of the imagination, but I think it's important to understand that you're not actually out; it's your body making a strong effort to actually preserve life. During freediving competitions, you will see people experience this and you will also see them get rescued in a very quick and calm manner; they'll be breathing again in a couple of seconds. LMC The more common, but I would say the less serious type of hypoxia, is an LMC, which stands for “loss of motor control”. In this form of hypoxia, the diver remains conscious, or you could say semi-conscious. The oxygen level is low, but it's not quite low enough for a full loss of consciousness. So your normal cellular functions are going to be disrupted because there isn't quite enough oxygen and what you see if you're watching someone have a loss of motor control is like an interrupted motion. A lot of like sort of shaking motion, usually in the head, the chin, maybe some wide unfocused eyes. Or it could be more subtle as well, sometimes if they're grabbing high on the comp line, maybe just the hand is shaking, or maybe just a foot twitches underwater. Τhat would be, I'm gonna use the term, less serious, not to say that it's not serious, but sort of easier to manage from a safety point of view, since the diver is still conscious. On A Personal Note   Ιn 2019 I had my first proper experience with hypoxia and it was totally my fault. Ιt was a four-day long competition which isn't normal, usually, there's kind of like two days and then a break. Βut because it was a short comp there was no break, it was kind of on the athlete to take a break, if they thought they needed one. Ι was doing dives that were quite close to my limit. In the first two days, I did a record in free immersion for Canada and also another one with bifins, and I did that one in quite a strong current. Then I made a lot of mistakes after I stayed out in the water for seven or eight hours, watching my friends compete those were about 60 divers, so it was quite a long day. I had this water bottle, which holds one liter, which is not enough for all these hours in the sun, I can tell you that definitively no, and I didn't have food as well. When you're in the water and it's hot - you're in the Caribbean - it feels great. You don't realize that you're getting sunburned you know, you just don't realize what's happening until you get out of the water. When I got out of the water, I was on the taxi home and I realized my face was lobster red, I was dehydrated, I was starving and I was like “oh this isn't good”, but because I was stubborn and because previously I'd been able to get away with quite a bit, in terms of how I treated myself the day before a dive, I was just thinking “okay, as long as you rehydrate and have a good sleep and have a good meal, everything will be fine”. Well, it wasn't fine! On top of that, the dive that I was trying the next day was my personal best, so mentally there's mental stress, and it was going to be a continental record, so I really wanted it. So I dived and at the end of it, I had my first proper LMC. It was a big one, it lasted about 17 seconds, which is quite big for an LMC. So I disqualified myself during that, but I got stubborn and I was like “oh you know that was just a one-off thing and I'm sure if I fix my mistakes I can dive tomorrow” which was a mistake. I’d heard over and over that, if you are hypoxic, your body and your mind have kind of like almost like muscle memory for that. It's like a neural pathway; if you create that pathway and then you use it, it's easy to then just sort of use it again soon. So what I should have done would be either just don't dive the next day or pull back, maybe take 10 meters off and just do a dive for fun. But I was stubborn, I was like “I’m going to try the same dive again” and the result, which was absolutely no mystery, was a super small surface blackout; the first one and actually - knock on wood - the only one I've ever had. Alchemy V330 PROSheena's Short Freediving Carbon Fins Of Choice
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Spearfishing Groupers In Florida

Spearfishing groupers off the coast of Florida is always good fun. But which coast you’re on (Gulf or Atlantic) will define what you can pick and when. The FWC maintains the two coasts differently, so it’s essential to acknowledge what’s in season and what you can harvest from every location. Grouper season in Florida’s Atlantic Coast for both state and federal waters runs from May 1 until December 31 every year. Key West Waterman and the gang, went out on their first grouper hunt of the season on May 1st. With near-perfect weather conditions, success was inevitable. Dive In Meet The Alchemy S Aaron's Carbon Spearfishing Fins Of Choice
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Teiva
25/11/2020
POLYNESIA (FRENCH)
alchemy V3

Really good fins. The best for spearfishing competitions!

Verified Buyer
Miguel Azevedo
27/11/2020
SPAIN
alchemy V3

When I got my fins (2017) they were alchemy's top of the line. I have been using them for both pure freediving(cwtb and safety) and spearfishing, sometimes on rough seas and harsh environments and they still perform as top of the line fins! These are definitely worth the investment, durable, reliable, the best fins I ever tried. Although I am curious about the v3-30.

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Adektula Sabsor
27/11/2020
INDONESIA
alchemy V3-30

The product is very good, the performance is also good, very supportive of performance when diving. Unfortunately the spoon for the c4 300 foot pocket cannot be purchased easily in Indonesia.

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Anton Hartanto
27/11/2020
INDONESIA
alchemy V3

Great product with great after sale benefit.

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Samantha Kildegaard
25/11/2020
TURKS AND CAICOS
alchemy V3

Top quality fins with top notch performance and ultra comfortable footpockets.

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Sharmaine Nahine
30/03/2021
PHILIPPINES
alchemy V3-30 Pro

I love my new short fins. Very impressive and it's really powerful for a short fins. Love it!

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Pu Reum Kim
02/12/2020
SOUTH KOREA
alchemy V3

I hope there are more convenient ways to carry it around.

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Raul Vega
30/11/2020
PUERTO RICO
alchemy V3

Amazing !!!

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Eason Huang
27/11/2020
TAIWAN
alchemy V3 Pro

Been beating them fins ever since I got them and they serve me well, just love it.

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Tomislav A.
20/04/2021
CROATIA
alchemy V3-30

I'm using V3-30 with C4 300 footpockets for two seasons and they are by far the best carbon fins I had (I had Carbontek and Mtehnic). I'm using them in summer and winter up to 25m with 4-6 kg weights and I'm around 105 kg. I bought medium stiffness. My dive are mostly with a lot of swimming (no boat) and finally I have great combination on my feet - I don't get tired after more than 6 hours in the sea. Dive ascend has never been so easy, descent is little bit harder because I think I should bought medium-hard fins. But no regrets and not looking back :)

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