Competitive Diving Is The Stupidest Thing Of All

In his book "Deep: Freediving, Renegade Science, and What the Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves", author James Nestor researched the history of freediving, its modern state, as well as how that's connected to our own existence. In a recent podcast, he spoke about the Ama divers that he met in Japan and their perception of competitive diving. Dive In In the past, about 400-500 years ago, the largest fishing fleet in the world was this group of Japanese women called Ama, and they just spent their lives, from the time they were teenagers until they were very old, harvesting urchins and abalone and fish, all those good things on the seafloor. All of the pearl divers from the past, those were all freedivers, sponge divers in Greece, all freedivers, the Vikings were pretty good freedivers… A year and a half ago I went to Japan and actually found some of these Ama divers who actually do this for a living. One of them was 82 years old and she'd been diving every day since she was 16, and she was just like the biggest badass you've ever seen. So it was great to see that they were keeping the tradition alive, at least for now, and see these people that are just so intimately connected to the ocean. It was really interesting to see their approach compared to competitive freedivers. The Ama were able to do phenomenal things but they didn't have this weird drive, they just seemed more at one with the ocean. You know, the Ama in all of their recorded history, and there's quite a lot of it, there's no record of them ever competing, and there’s no record of them ever having an accident, ever blacking out or dying from doing this. I met half a dozen Ama who had been literally diving since they were teenagers, every day, and they were in their 70s and 80s. So, this stuff can be practiced in a sane manner, and they just think competitive diving is the stupidest thing of all! It would be like competitive yoga or something, like seeing how far your back can bend before you break it! Their respect for the ocean and their place in the ocean really added a different element and a different layer to freediving. It was that sort of freediving, this respectful, meditative freediving that I really glommed on to and try to explore in the book. How To Avoid Freediving Blackouts
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2-Hour Grouper Extraction

How's it going boys and girls, welcome back to Key West Waterman, my name's Aaron Young. This episode's a little different because it's not really a full story, not kind of topside talking and everything that I normally do. This video is about one fish, the entire process of getting this one fish out, and I'm not going to cover every single dive, but I'm going to cover the majority of them. So, let's see how you can harvest a grouper at 67 ft, who's hiding in a complex cave. Dive In Meet Alchemy SKey West Waterman's Carbon Fins Of Choice
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How To Train In Pool For Depth Freediving

Freediving training in the pool is a powerful practice to enhance your abilities in breath hold and technique. In deep freediving, you are limited to the number of dives you can do. If you are doing deep diving you may do only one dive, after your warmups, if you are doing shallower still only a few dives in depth. So, on a limited number of dives, you are only able to work on your technique for a short period of time. In pool training, you can train and do many repetitions. Pool training may not be the most appealing medium to deep divers, or to those who are more drawn to the ocean. But pool training can give your deep diving a huge added advantage because you are able to do many dives in a session and really spend much time working on technique and on breath hold, so higher levels of CO2. Simulation One great way to train in the pool specifically for depth is to simulate the dive. You can do this by diving the length of the pool or more and then performing a static and then performing a dynamic to return. Training in a 25-meter pool is a great way to do this because it will simulate the freefall starting at 25 meters, the static is the time of the freefall, and the dynamic swim back to the other side of the pool, perhaps even returning to the other end again, would simulate the 50-meter dive. So to break that down again, dynamic swim 25 meters, hang in static for 25-30 seconds, return with the dynamic swim, swimming the length of the pool twice more. This may be quite mentally taxing for many as you do not get the wonderful enjoyment of the freefall and the experience of the pressure from the depth. But to perform this would make 50-meter dives to depth so much more easier and enjoyable. The tolerance to lactic acid in the legs will be greatly enhanced and CO2 tolerance increases. Training for longer dives that can also mimic a spearfishing or photography dive and learning to place more focus on your relaxation is where delay training excels. The idea is to place a delay or static apnea at a point of your dive depending on what you are training for. Set a distance of your swim, set a time for your delay, and pick a spot in your dive for a delay (start/middle/end). Get your safety buddy to carry a stopwatch and follow you throughout your dive, a good mental booster is to also record the total dive time so you can feel more confident in longer performances in the future. For longer dive times, more relaxing dives, delay at the start. For a dive that mimics a depth dive to pursue prey or a picture, delay in the middle of your dive. And for those that like a challenge delay at the end of your swim, each of these will feel different as there is a changing level of co2 present in your body at each delay. No Wetsuit, No Weights If you are training for depth, spearfishing, or really anything but pool distance apnea (DYN or DNF), leave your wetsuit and weights at home. If you are wearing a wetsuit, you will not feel the water flowing on your skin, which means you will get less feedback on how effective and efficient your kick or stroke technique is. The same goes for weights. If you are pool training as conditioning for the ocean, you should be swimming at a fast enough pace that you do not need weights to stay down (particularly if you aren't wearing a wetsuit). Try training with short fins as opposed to the regular long freediving fins. This means that to get the max out of your kicks you will need to have a much more efficient kick. Also that you can build your tolerance to lactic as you will feel that burn much sooner than if you are wearing the long fins. Even practicing monofin you can use the short fins, practice dolphin kicking, and eventually, you will even try mono-finning and bi-finning without fins on. Apart from being a competitive discipline in its own right, Dynamic Apnea is probably the single most important training mode for Constant Weight, other than doing Constant Weights training itself. Dynamic is breath-hold with stress, as in Constant Weight, providing the opportunity to do Hypoxic Training – Lactic Acid Training, to train the specific muscles you would use in Constant Weights and train style and rhythm. 7 Fun Freediving Pool Exercises By Jaap  The best exercises are those that don’t feel like exercises. If you don’t enjoy doing static or dynamic sessions, there are still ways you can train. You simply need to find some fun things to do underwater. Here are some ideas. Freediving games - Anything done in the pool on breath hold qualifies. Bang bang, chess, or series of rock paper scissors or the penny race (from the manual of freediving by Pelizarri & Tovaglieri). The kicking relay - this exercise helps you with your comfort and posture underwater. Try to kick perfectly vertical (into the floor of the pool). The first diver goes down on RV, FRC, or full lungs, and kicks twice once the hands are on the floor. Once the first diver is up the second diver goes down and does two kicks. And so forth. For each round the amount of kicks increases. Three divers is ideal (the last one to dive becomes the safety of the next diver). The weight walk - in this exercise the freediver carries a heavy weight along the bottom of the pool. It is difficult to move fast underwater while holding a heavy weight, so this exercise forces you to relax. The slow crawl - a simple crawl along the bottom, as slow as you can. Feel the water glide over your hands and face and relax. Time spent is more important than distance for this exercise. Frog flow - lounge at the bottom for a while, and then leap like a frog. Repeat. Try to focus on all the sensations in your body. Again time spent is more important than distance. Beat up your buddy - underwater jujitsu, karate, or other martial arts are a great workout. We realized this after spending a pool session with a couple of freedivers that work as film stunt performers. Keep it fun and safe… no intense chokeholds. Unless you really don’t like your buddy! Puzzle - in case you do not have enough divers in the pool for two divers to go down simultaneously for games, some fun puzzles will do. A Rubiks cube is a great way to increase your comfort level underwater without focusing on the clock. Just stop before it gets too frustrating! Do A Warm-Down A lot of freedivers, even experienced competitors, skip this step. All you need to do for your warm-down is about 10 minutes of easy, aerobic activity, such as some relaxed surface swimming. This will get the blood flowing to the muscles, open up capillaries, flush out metabolic waste, and aid in muscle recovery. For apnea, warm-down is particularly important because while we want to experience vasoconstriction and dive response during our dives, dive response and any lingering effects are not good for building or maintaining muscles. Our muscles need blood flow and oxygen to recover. How To Improve Your Bifins Technique
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Lazaro del Toro
25/11/2020
UNITED STATES
alchemy V3

I never thought a piece of gear would change my dives so drastically, but it did. The alchemy fins even when compared to other carbon fins are just superior, the finish and comfort it is just incredible. I do freediving and spearfishing, and for both it has fit the task. I am 205 lbs and with a medium stiffness I've found the proper balance. Definetely I'll be a costumer for years to come !

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Hitomi
27/11/2020
JAPAN
alchemy V3

The carbon is very light and you can swim in the water very comfortably.

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Robert MacKichan
30/03/2021
HONDURAS
alchemy V3 Pro

Built with great quality and care. Great for traveling and all around enjoying the ocean. Snorkeling exploring the reef and going on the line these are fun easy to travel with fins.

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Madeleine Clough
28/11/2020
CANADA
alchemy V3

The blades are beautiful. In hindsight, I would have chosen a softer blade. But they are still fast and efficient. The foot pocket I purchased, from the same website is much too large (width) and I wish to change them out. Thank you for your beautiful construction.

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Hana
30/11/2020
SOUTH KOREA
alchemy V3-30

Alchemy fins were my dream fins for long and v330 is my very first set of carbon fins. Absolutely the best, both in quality and design. Love it and def want more from this brand!

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Sky Lindell
13/12/2021
UNITED STATES
alchemy V3

Best fins I ever used. Best on the market brings me down and up to 100+ with ease. Until they broke on me but I think that’s due to a manufacturing defect. Still can’t wait for the next pair.

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Teiva
25/11/2020
POLYNESIA (FRENCH)
alchemy V3

Really good fins. The best for spearfishing competitions!

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Tsung Han Kuo
30/11/2020
TAIWAN
alchemy V3-30

Very good.

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Linda Stenman
05/12/2020
SWEDEN
alchemy V3

I have the V3 with the C4 footpockets. I have never had a combination of fin and footpocket with perfect fit for my style of finning before. I can highly recommend Alchemy fins any day of the week, you will not get disappointed.

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Michelle Fallon
28/11/2020
UNITED STATES
alchemy V3

I'm extremely pleased with these lightweight, high performance freediving fins! I've traveled halfway across the world with them from Hawaii, to Mexico and to the Bahamas. Made to perfection with only the highest quality of materials I couldn't imagine doing my dives without them.

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