Do You Enjoy Eating Plastic For Dinner

Microplastics are pieces smaller than 5 millimeters. Some of them are used in cosmetics or toothpaste but most result from floating waste that is constantly exposed to UV radiation and crumbles into smaller and smaller pieces into the ocean, where they are even more easily swallowed by all kinds of marine life. According to the UN, this has raised concerns among scientists, especially about health risks from the chemicals that are added to the plastic. BPA, for example, makes plastic bottles transparent but there's also evidence that it interferes with our hormonal system. DEHP makes the plastic more flexible but may cause cancer. It would be pretty bad if microplastics are toxic because they travel up the food chain. Zooplankton eats microplastic, small fish eat zooplankton, and so do oysters, crabs, and predatory fish. And they all land on our plates. Microplastics have been found in honey, sea salt, beer, tap water, and in the household dust around us. 8 out of 10 babies and nearly all adults have measurable amounts of phthalates, a common plastic additive, in their bodies. And 93% of people have BPA in their urine. There is little science about this so far, and right now it's inconclusive. We need a lot more research before panic is justified, but it is safe to say that a lot of stuff happened that we didn’t plan for and we have lost control over plastic, to a certain extent, which is kind of scary.
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How Does Freediving In Freezing Temperatures Feel Like

In 2022, Luca Malaguti, Daan Verhoeven & Tim Emmett embarked on a trip to Greenland, being part of a team producing a film for Movember. Ice-climber Tim Emmett experienced firsthand what it feels like to freedive in such freezing temperatures. Here's what he said about it in E6 of the Alchemy Podcast. Dive In "If you haven't been in really cold water before, the way I see it is... you know the feeling of, like, when you dip your toe or you put your hand into really cold water, and instantly it's like that freezing sensation and it really gets painful? To immerse your body into such water, it takes a lot of physical preparation, but mainly mental preparation, where, rather than repelling against the feeling that you are getting, if you embrace that sensation and you let it in and you accept it, then you can tolerate it. If you are really determined. But you have to let it, you have to go with it rather than repel against it, you know. Photo by Daan Verhoeven And I think, as humans our initial response is to get out instantly or, if something's painful, remove yourself from that environment - it's an instant reaction that's very natural. And with cold water freediving, it's really the opposite of that. You embrace it and accept it and go with it. When you're freediving, you can't hyperventilate at all because the difference between just general cold water swimming where your head's above the water and being under the water is that when you hold your breath and immerse your head, that sensation of cold is like really all over your face, all over your eyes and your ears. And it's a very sensitive part of your body. Your brain is the key hub for everything really. And also, you don't wanna be hyperventilating and then going freediving cuz then you can black out and get into all sorts of troubles". Watch The Guys Freedive Under Icebergs In Greenland
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Visualization In Not Only Helpful To Freedivers

Alex Honnold is a professional rock climber whose free solo ascents of some of the world's most scary cliffs have made him a climbing legend. During a Ted Talk, he revealed that prior to climbing El Capitan in "Free Solo" - you have to watch that  -  he worked on cultivating a certain mindset through visualization. Managing Fear Today I’d like to talk about how I was able to feel so comfortable and how I overcame my fear.  The thing that makes El Cap so intimidating is the sheer scale of the wall. Most climbers take three to five days to ascend the 3,000 feet of vertical granite. The idea of setting out up a wall of that size with nothing but shoes and a chalk bag seemed impossible. 3,000 feet of climbing represents thousands of distinct hand and foot movements, which is a lot to remember. Many of the moves I knew through sheer repetition I’d climbed El Cap maybe 50 times over the previous decade with a rope. Once I found sequences that felt secure and repeatable, I had to memorize them. I had to make sure that they were so deeply ingrained within me that there was no possibility of error. I didn’t want to be wondering if I was going the right way or using the best holds. Just Like Freediving, Free Soloing Is A Mind Game I needed everything to feel automatic. Climbing with a rope is a largely physical effort. You just have to be strong enough to hold on and make the movements upward. But free soloing plays out more in the mind. The physical effort is largely the same. Your body is still climbing the same wall. But staying calm and performing at your best when you know that any mistake could mean death requires a certain kind of mindset. I worked to cultivate that mindset through visualization, which basically just means imagining the entire experience of soloing the wall. Partially, that was to help me remember all the holds, but mostly visualization was about feeling the texture of each hold in my hand and imagining the sensation of my leg reaching out and placing my foot just so. I’d imagine it all like a choreographed dance thousands of feet up. The most difficult part of the whole route was called the Boulder Problem. It was about 2,000 feet off the ground and consisted of the hardest physical moves on the whole route: long pulls between poor handholds with very small, slippery feet. This is what I mean by a poor handhold: an edge smaller than the width of a pencil but facing downward that I had to press up into with my thumb. But that wasn’t even the hardest part. The crux culminated in a karate kick with my left foot over to the inside of an adjacent corner, a maneuver that required a high degree of precision and flexibility, enough so that I’d been doing a nightly stretching routine for a full year ahead of time to make sure that I could comfortably make the reach with my leg. As I practiced the moves, my visualization turned to the emotional component of a potential solo. Basically, what if I got up there and it was too scary? What if I was too tired? What if I couldn’t quite make the kick? I had to consider every possibility while I was safely on the ground so that when the time came and I was actually making the moves without a rope, there was no room for doubt to creep in. Doubt is the precursor to fear, and I knew that I couldn’t experience my perfect moment if I was afraid. I had to visualize and rehearse enough to remove all doubt. But beyond that, I also visualized how it would feel if it never seemed doable. What if, after so much work, I was afraid to try? What if I was wasting my time and I would never feel comfortable in such an exposed position? There were no easy answers, but El Cap meant enough to me that I would put in the work and find out. I needed everything to feel perfect if I was ever going to climb the route without a rope. After two seasons of working specifically toward a potential free solo of El Cap, I finally finished all my preparations. I knew every handhold and foothold on the whole route, and I knew exactly what to do. Basically, I was ready. Watch The Free Solo Trailer Visualization For Freediving  
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Stephane Warin
25/11/2020
FRANCE
alchemy V3-30

Very efficient, it is not easy for me to find the correct size of foot pockets, I am always between 2 sizes. The C4-400 is fine, the carbon is just awesome and the fins are light. Classy expensive fins. Top world class efficiency. As a freediver instructor, I test sometimes the fins's students. Alchemy is another world clearly.

Verified Buyer
Raul Vega
30/11/2020
PUERTO RICO
alchemy V3

Amazing !!!

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Camila Caba
27/11/2020
UNITED STATES
alchemy S

I love the product so much I tell everyone I know to get them.

Verified Buyer
Kirsten Sebastian
28/11/2020
PHILIPPINES
alchemy V3

These carbon fiber fins are the best ones I've ever owned, and I know a lot of freedivers who can say the same with gusto. They are incredibly light weight and I barely feel them - it's as close to my being finless during Free Immersion. You exert less energy, reach depth goals, and increase bottom time with these. 10/10 would recommend to everyone - from beginner to pro.

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Bomi Kim
31/03/2021
SOUTH KOREA
alchemy V3

I'm using alchemy v3 with a pink saft .Also, it is less the resistance of water that makes me more shiny.

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Teiva
25/11/2020
POLYNESIA (FRENCH)
alchemy V3

Really good fins. The best for spearfishing competitions!

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Eason Huang
27/11/2020
TAIWAN
alchemy V3 Pro

Been beating them fins ever since I got them and they serve me well, just love it.

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Michael Baade
31/03/2021
PANAMA
alchemy S-30

It's a great product, great quality, hopefully you guys could sell it in more remote places like Panamá! There is a big market in Central America!

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Grace Panliya
30/03/2021
THAILAND
alchemy V3-30

I gave my friend's a try and everyone likes it, awesome.

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Luciana Amelia Kaunang
08/12/2020
INDONESIA
alchemy V3-30

The fins are very good and light, making it easier when you are dynamic or trying to dive at depth, very efficient and flexible too.

Verified Buyer